Leaky Gut Tag

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Maintaining proper gut health plays a key role in optimizing your personal wellness. Risk factors such as autoimmune disorders, poor nutrition and stress have all been linked to disruption of the gut’s microbiota, resulting in varied GI conditions. However, it’s not always easy to distinguish between common diagnoses.   Like many GI disorders, IBS and leaky gut continue to be a mystery to many, so we wanted to break down the differences (and similarities) between the two.   What Is Ibs?   Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic, functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder that primarily impacts the large intestine. Though it impacts up to 20 percent of the global population, there is still relatively little known about IBS. Common symptoms include abdominal pain, bloating, constipation and/or

You may have heard the term “leaky gut” blamed for just about everything from weight gain to eczema to depression. Medical professionals call this condition increased intestinal permeability, but what is it and how do you know if you have it?   The gut is a very complex system and we’re still learning how it influences health. Left untreated, we know that a leaky gut can cause gastrointestinal conditions like irritable bowel syndrome, celiac disease and Crohn’s disease, among others.   Researchers have connected the health of the gut and the microbiome to other conditions like obesity, allergies, arthritis, mental illness, Parkinson’s disease, autism, liver disease, Type 2 diabetes, cancers and autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis and lupus.   How Does a Leaky Gut Develop?   The walls

Leaky gut is a condition that creates gaps in the lining of the intestinal walls. These gaps allow food particles, bacteria, and waste products to seep directly into the bloodstream. Eating foods that positively influence intestinal bacteria and inflammation can help relieve symptoms.   Leaky gut describes how easily substances such as food, nutrients, and bacteria can pass through the intestinal wall. The intestinal wall consists of epithelial cells. Tiny gaps between these cells allow water, ions, and other nutrients to flow from the intestines into the bloodstream. Usually, food and waste particles cannot pass through these gaps. In leaky gut syndrome, however, inflammation and bacterial imbalances in the gut cause these gaps to expand. This allows harmful substances to leak into the bloodstream.   In

Irritable Bowel Syndrome or spastic colon is the most common reason for seeing a gastroenterologist. Irritable Bowel Syndrome is characterized by chronic abdominal pain, discomfort, bloating, constipation and diarrhea in the absence of any detectable organic cause.    Irritable Bowel Syndrome may begin after an infection, stress, or onset of maturity without any other medical indicators. Irritable bowel syndrome may be closely related to Leaky Gut Syndrome since many of the symptoms are the same.   Traditional medicine believes that Irritable Bowel Syndrome is idiopathic…has no real cure because there is no real pathology. The most common theory is that Irritable Bowel Syndrome is a miscommunication between the brain and bowels; but there is no medical research to confirm this hypothesis. Medical treatments focus

The best diet for leaky gut is full of nutrient-dense whole foods, with a diverse range of fruits and vegetables.   Evidence tells us that one of the causes of leaky gut is modern, processed food, especially sugar, refined carbohydrates and industrial fats. So it makes sense that the best diet for leaky gut would exclude these.   Eating a healthy diet should be simple, but in reality, knowing what’s good for you and what isn’t is a minefield. Official advice from health authorities seems to change every week, food trends come and go and what you ate as a teenager may no longer serve you well today.   What Is Leaky Gut Syndrome?   Your gut has a barrier that plays a critical role in keeping you

Increased intestinal permeability, also known as leaky gut, occurs when the barrier between the gut and the bloodstream (mucosal membrane) fails to prevent potentially harmful molecules from entering the bloodstream. These molecules include large fat particles, toxins, and bacteria, which may cause bowel dysfunction and a generalized inflammation in the body, which in turn contributes to chronic health problems such as heart disease, cancer, and dementia. Leaky gut is a syndrome or group of symptoms, not a disease.   The Leaky Gut Test   Testing for leaky gut is relatively new. The “lactulose mannitol ratio” test or challenge is also known as the Intestinal Permeability Assessment and is used to uncover disorders characterized by changes in gut permeability.   During the test, you will be asked