Leaky Gut

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Usually the most difficult things to cut out of someone's diet are grains, dairy, sugar and alcohol.  Let’s discuss some of the basics behind why it's good to take a break from these. Worst case scenario: you go 4 weeks without some foods you like. Best case scenario: you realize that you're eating something that's making you sick or fat.   Grains   Grains want to germinate in the soil and not die in our bellies and while they can't run away, they definitely have mechanisms to fight back. These protective measures cause low-grade digestive distress in many people (even gluten-free). Also, grains contain prolamins that lead to gut permeability and phytates that bind to other minerals in our body and make them unavailable

Nothing puts a damper on your day like a sick stomach. For some people, this is an everyday reality. If you find yourself constantly feeling uncomfortable, you may want to look to your microbiome for some answers.    Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth   SIBO is just as the name states- an excessive amount of bacteria in your small intestine. Some people suffer from mild discomfort, while others struggle with chronic diarrhea or nutrient deficiencies. Scientists originally thought this diagnosis was limited to those with an abnormal gastrointestinal tract or issues with intestinal contractions, but new data says otherwise.   What Are The Symptoms Of Sibo?   If you’ve had a history of Irritable Bowel Syndrome you may want to look into testing for SIBO. They share symptoms such

Maintaining proper gut health plays a key role in optimizing your personal wellness. Risk factors such as autoimmune disorders, poor nutrition and stress have all been linked to disruption of the gut’s microbiota, resulting in varied GI conditions. However, it’s not always easy to distinguish between common diagnoses.   Like many GI disorders, IBS and leaky gut continue to be a mystery to many, so we wanted to break down the differences (and similarities) between the two.   What Is Ibs?   Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic, functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder that primarily impacts the large intestine. Though it impacts up to 20 percent of the global population, there is still relatively little known about IBS. Common symptoms include abdominal pain, bloating, constipation and/or

You may have heard the term “leaky gut” blamed for just about everything from weight gain to eczema to depression. Medical professionals call this condition increased intestinal permeability, but what is it and how do you know if you have it?   The gut is a very complex system and we’re still learning how it influences health. Left untreated, we know that a leaky gut can cause gastrointestinal conditions like irritable bowel syndrome, celiac disease and Crohn’s disease, among others.   Researchers have connected the health of the gut and the microbiome to other conditions like obesity, allergies, arthritis, mental illness, Parkinson’s disease, autism, liver disease, Type 2 diabetes, cancers and autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis and lupus.   How Does a Leaky Gut Develop?   The walls

Leaky gut is a condition that creates gaps in the lining of the intestinal walls. These gaps allow food particles, bacteria, and waste products to seep directly into the bloodstream. Eating foods that positively influence intestinal bacteria and inflammation can help relieve symptoms.   Leaky gut describes how easily substances such as food, nutrients, and bacteria can pass through the intestinal wall. The intestinal wall consists of epithelial cells. Tiny gaps between these cells allow water, ions, and other nutrients to flow from the intestines into the bloodstream. Usually, food and waste particles cannot pass through these gaps. In leaky gut syndrome, however, inflammation and bacterial imbalances in the gut cause these gaps to expand. This allows harmful substances to leak into the bloodstream.   In

Irritable Bowel Syndrome or spastic colon is the most common reason for seeing a gastroenterologist. Irritable Bowel Syndrome is characterized by chronic abdominal pain, discomfort, bloating, constipation and diarrhea in the absence of any detectable organic cause.    Irritable Bowel Syndrome may begin after an infection, stress, or onset of maturity without any other medical indicators. Irritable bowel syndrome may be closely related to Leaky Gut Syndrome since many of the symptoms are the same.   Traditional medicine believes that Irritable Bowel Syndrome is idiopathic…has no real cure because there is no real pathology. The most common theory is that Irritable Bowel Syndrome is a miscommunication between the brain and bowels; but there is no medical research to confirm this hypothesis. Medical treatments focus